Toa Payoh Bus Interchange

Toa Payoh Bus Interchange is an Integrated Transport Hub (ITH) located at Toa Payoh Town Centre, serving the town of Toa Payoh and Braddell. It is the first air-conditioned bus interchange in Singapore, integrated within the Toa Payoh HDB Hub and built on top of Toa Payoh MRT Station.

Details:

Name Toa Payoh Bus Interchange  |  大巴窑巴士转换站
Address 530 Lorong 6 Toa Payoh, Singapore 310530
BCM Route Package Bishan-Toa Payoh Bus Package
Anchor Operator SBS Transit
Bus Routes 20 (SBST), 1 (Tower Transit)
Berths 4 sawtooth, 14 end-on
Rail Connection  NS19   Toa Payoh

The Interchange:

Toa Payoh Bus Interchange is a bus station located in the residential town of Toa Payoh. Connecting with Toa Payoh MRT Station along the North-South Line, the interchange is a transport node for commuters heading in and out of town, allowing for convenient transfers between the rail network and the many bus services at the interchange.

Toa Payoh Interchange - Central Concourse
Toa Payoh Interchange – Central Concourse

Opened in May 2002, Toa Payoh Bus Interchange was the first air-conditioned bus interchange to be opened in Singapore, as well as the first Integrated Transport Hub (ITH). The interchange is integrated within the retail portion of Toa Payoh HDB Hub, which also houses commercial offices and residential developments under one roof.

The facility is built on top of the underground Toa Payoh MRT Station, which adds to the convenience of transferring between buses and trains. The interchange design is a unique mix of end-on berths on the western side, and sawtooth berths on the eastern side.

History:

  • 1971: Toa Payoh Central Bus Terminal begins operations
  • 1983: Toa Payoh Bus Interchange is built
  • 1999: Interchange demolished, shifted to a temporary site
  • 2002: New Toa Payoh Interchange opens.

Toa Payoh New Town was developed in the mid-1960s, and by the late 1960s, there were still no proper facilities for buses at Toa Payoh. The roadside bus terminal along Lorong 1 Toa Payoh was a constant source of traffic jams, and other roadside terminals along Lorong 6 Toa Payoh and Kim Keat Avenue existed back then. After much public appeal, the Housing and and Development Board (HDB) constructed a new bus terminal the junction of Lorong 2 Toa Payoh and Lorong 4 Toa Payoh. Opened in August 1971, the Toa Payoh Central Bus Terminal, otherwise also known as Toa Payoh Town Centre Bus Terminal, was able to accommodate 130 buses. The terminal would cease operations in the 1980s.

Layout of Toa Payoh Interchange in 1983
Layout of Toa Payoh Interchange in 1983

On 26 December 1983, Toa Payoh Bus Interchange was opened. Constructed over the existing site, it contained many new facilities such as coin-changing machines and information counters. That same day, the Toa Payoh Bus Plan was initiated, which reorganized the bus routes within Toa Payoh and with it, the introduction of six new Feeder bus routes. In 1999, the interchange was demolished to make way for the construction of HDB Hub, which would be the new headquarters of the Housing and Development Board (HDB). Bus operator SBS moved their bus operations to a temporary facility opposite Lorong 6 Toa Payoh, where Toa Payoh Town Park currently sits now.

On 19 May 2002, the current Toa Payoh Bus Interchange was officially opened by then-Minister for Transport, Yeo Cheow Tong. Integrated within the HDB Hub, the facility is directly connected to Toa Payoh MRT Station and offers retail, commercial and residential developments under one roof. It is notably the first Integrated Transport Hub (ITH) in Singapore and the first air-conditioned bus interchange.

Feeder bus services:

Toa Payoh Interchange has housed seven feeder services:

  • Service 230: Looped at Lorong 8 Toa Payoh. Withdrawn.
  • Service 231: Looped at Braddel via Lorong 1, 4 and 6. Green/White plate designations were used for clockwise and anticlockwise loops respectively. Merged into a single Service 231 when it was amended to loop at Toa Payoh Lorong 5 in 2012.
  • Service 232: Looped at Lorong 2 Toa Payoh, using Green/White plate. Amended to Lorong 4 and TPY Central in 1993, and merged with 237 to loop at Lorong 7.
  • Service 235: Looped at Lorong 3 Toa Payoh. Amended to Toa Payoh East in 2010, and extended to Toa Payoh Rise (Caldecott MRT) in 2012 via Lorong 3, 2 and 1.
  • Service 237: Looped at Lorong 7 Toa Payoh, via Lorong 6 and Toa Payoh East. Merged with 232 and withdrawn in 2002.
  • Service 238: Looped at Lorong 8 Toa Payoh, no route change.
  • Service 239: Looped at Kim Keat Avenue, withdrawn in 1985 after road realignment works to accommodate the slip road to PIE.

Interchange facilities:

  • Interchange offices (SBST)
  • Transitlink Office
  • Drivers lounge
  • NTWU Canteen
  • Boarding and alighting berths
  • Information boards & Bus arrival displays
  • Service guide racks
  • Retail outlets
  • Toilets

Bus Services List:

Service Berth Destination Notes
8 A7 Tampines  
26 A12 Bedok  
28 A13 Tampines  
31 A5 Tampines  
73 B3 Ang Mo Kio  
88 A9 Pasir Ris  
90 A6 ↺ Airport Road  
139 A3 Bukit Merah  
139M A2 ↺ Jalan Bahagia  
141 B3 Lorong 1 Geylang  
142 B2 ↺ Potong Pasir Avenue 2  
143 A1 Jurong East  
145 A4 Buona Vista  
155 A14 Bedok  
157 B4 Boon Lay  
159 B4 Sengkang  
163 B3 Sengkang  
231 B1 ↺ Toa Payoh Lorong 5  
232 B2 ↺ Toa Payoh East  
235 B2 ↺ Toa Payoh Rise  
238 B1 ↺ Braddel Road  
Berth Allocation:

In Toa Payoh Interchange, A-prefixes are used for end-on berths while B-prefixes are used for sawtooth berths. Unused queuing berths are often used as additional parking space for other services.

Berth Type Services
A1 End-on 143
A2 End-on 139M
A3 End-on 139
A4 End-on 145
A5 End-on 31
A6 End-on 90
A7 End-on 8
A8 End-on Unused / Spare berth
A9 End-on 88
A10 End-on Unused / Spare berth
A11 End-on Unused / Spare berth
A12 End-on 26
A13 End-on 28
A14 End-on 155
Alighting Linear For alighting only
B1 Sawtooth 231, 238
B2 Sawtooth 142, 232, 235
B3 Sawtooth 73, 141, 163
B4 Sawtooth 157, 159
 

Gallery (Sawtooth Berths):

Gallery (End-on berths):

Station Entrances:


External Links & References:

Back to Bus Interchanges and Terminals
Back to Bus Articles

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