Circle Line

  Circle Line  
Stadium MRT Station
Stadium MRT Station
Type Medium-capacity rail
Station Count 30 (Operational)
3 (Under planning)
Line length 35.5 km (Operational)
4 km (Under planning)
Termini Dhoby Ghaut
Marina Bay
HarbourFront
Depot Kim Chuan Depot
Operational Data
Operators SMRT Trains
Rolling stock Alstom Metropolis C830
Alstom Metropolis C830C
Electrification 750 V DC third rail
Track gauge Standard Gauge (1435mm)
Opened 28 May 2009 (Stage 3)
17 Apr 2010 (Stage 1 & 2)
08 Oct 2011 (Stage 4 & 5)
14 Jan 2012 (CCLe)
Year 2025 (Stage 6)

The Circle Line (CCL) is an underground, driverless, medium-capacity MRT line and the fourth rail line in Singapore, running an orbital route through residential areas and linking all radial routes leading to the city. The line is currently 35.5 km long with 30 stations, running from Dhoby Ghaut (CC1) to HarbourFront (CC29) via Serangoon. A separate branch line known as the Circle Line Extension links Promenade (CC4) to Marina Bay (CE2) via Bayfront (CE1).

The line is also the first medium-capacity rail line in Singapore, with trains operating in a three-car formation, half as long as the usual six-car formation used on previous lines. The rolling stock is based out of Kim Chuan Depot, touted as the largest fully-underground train depot in the world.

Currently, Circle Line Stages 1 to 5 and the Circle Line Extension is in operation. A future line extension, the ‘Circle Line Stage 6‘ will complete the Circle Line, closing the circular route between HarbourFront and Marina Bay with 3 additional stations and scheduled for completion in 2025.

Timeline & History

  • 28 May 2009: Opening of Circle Line Stage 3, with trains running between Bartley and Marymount stations
  • 17 Apr 2010: Opening of Circle Line Stages 1 & 2, with trains running between Dhoby Ghaut and Marymount stations
  • 8 Oct 2011: Opening of Circle Line Stages 4 & 5, with trains running between Dhoby Ghaut and HarbourFront stations
  • 14 Jan 2012: Opening of Circle Line Extenision, connecting Promenade to Marina Bay via Bayfront

The Circle Line was planned as an orbital line linking all existing rail lines, allowing commuters to transfer between rail lines while avoiding the city centre, with interchanges at Paya Lebar, Serangoon, Bishan and Buona Vista. The southern reaches of the line would connect to the City centre. Construction work began in 2002-2003 and the line was constructed in 5 stages, along with Kim Chuan Depot, a fully underground train depot providing maintenance and stabling facilities for the Circle Line running stock.

Originally scheduled to open progressively from 2006 till 2010, the Nicoll Highway collapse of 2004 delayed the opening of Stages 1 and 2, resulting in the unaffected Stage 3 opening for revenue service first in 28 May 2009. A new Nicoll Highway station, two-thirds the size of the original station, was built a short distance away from the old station. Stages 1 and 2 eventually opened on 17 Apr 2010, opening up new connections to the Bras Basah and Marina Centre area.

Stages 4 & 5 opened a year later, on 8 Oct 2011, bringing the line to HarbourFront. Caldecott and Haw Par Villa stations, previously planned as shell stations, were built as normal stations and opened along with the rest of the line. That left Bukit Brown as the only remaining shell station on the Circle Line, awaiting future developments in the Bukit Brown area. Presently, its facilities are used as emergency escape shafts.

Train Stations

Stage 6 stations by Year 2025:

Rolling Stock

Alstom Metropolis C830 trainsets form the Circle Line rolling stock, operating in a three-car formation. A total of 40 trainsets were ordered, as part of turnkey Contract C830, and are stabled at Kim Chuan Depot. They are built in France by Alstom between 2006–2008.

Shanghai Alstom Metropolis C830C trainsets were ordered to increase the capacity of the Circle Line, also operating in a three-car formation. A total of 24 trainsets were ordered, as part of Contract C830C, and are also stabled at Kim Chuan Depot. Largely similar in design as their C830 cousins, these trains are built in China by Shanghai Alstom Transport Co. Ltd., a joint venture between Alstom and Shanghai Electric, between 2014–2015.